Tag Archives: photography

Enjoying Photo Overload

Since starting at the big daddy of photography, I’ve certainly been surrounded by imagery. Given that photography was a hobby of mine before then, I was a little worried that the interest would wane after being around photos all day long. Thankfully not.

Surveillance Cameras Surveillance Camera Duo

Some of the photo stuff I’m enjoying:

  • Linked before, The Big Picture blog puts together some great galleries on current world events.
  • Go install the Cooliris (formerly Piclens) plugin now! Exploring their selections, or browsing Flickr photostreams is so very cool-looking, and more practical than clicking “Next” page after page. (When the plugin doesn’t mess up, of course)
  • Browse the Getty Images Olympics coverage (also Piclens/Cooliris enabled!) for some great stuff.
  • My new lens, and my first Canon “L series” lens. Expensive, but totally worth it. I still need to shoot a side by side comparison with my first kit lens (similar wide angle) to show the quality difference.
  • I’m still posting some to my other Flickr photostream, but that’s getting to be a bit much with the iPhone and pocket camera (plus video mode) all contributing to the photo backlog.
  • Weird Olympics photos from the Guardian.
  • I keep hearing great things about the new version of Adobe Lightroom and will have to check it out, but I’m loving my Aperture workflow. Good organization tools, auto-tagging with the FlickrExport plugin, and all the adjustments I ever used from Photoshop.

Last September, I wrote this summary of three years with Flickr, and reaching the 1,000 photo-upload mark. Less than a year later, I’ve broken the mark of 2,000 photos on Flickr (somewhere in the midst of my bulk dodgeball photo upload). And in last year’s post, I claimed 32,000 views of my photos, but I think that was actually the view count for my photostream. Total views of my photos has now just topped the 150,000 mark, which I think is pretty crazy. Who are these people?

I guess I’ll keep taking photos as long as there’s stuff to be seen, and people keep looking.

New York City Visit and Photos

I finally caught up on all the photos I took while visiting New York City last week. Here’s the main batch with the usual assortment of street art, buildings and urban scenes. I also put together a small set of New York City standpipes in the tradition of my ongoing obsession with utility fixtures.

Green and Red Standpipes

And here’s another whole set of photos from my pocket camera (also the only wideangle I had with me), which includes more snapshots around the city.

The highlight of the trip was also the main reason I was there, the NYU Medical School graduation. It’s still hard to believe that my sister is now a doctor! The graduation ceremony itself was quite good, with some inspiring speeches, and the celebration afterward continued late into the night with a lot of happy new M.Ds.

And with any trip to New York, there was plenty of delicious and varied food (and drink) every day. I also made it to the Whitney Museum to catch the Whitney Biennial on a rainy afternoon. The amount of new art packed into the space was overwhelming, especially for someone like me who enjoys reading the full descriptions of nearly every piece (with contemporary art it’s almost a requirement in order to understand what’s going on). There was also a collection of early Maplethorpe polaroids. It was fun seeing a new photographer’s experiments in the instant-photo medium of the day, much like we all play with digital these days.

Until my next visit, thanks for the continued good times, New York!

Internationally Published Photographer? Dubai?

About a month ago I got a message on Flickr from a Japanese publishing company, CONEX Asia Network, requesting to use a photo of mine in a business magazine of theirs. Even more surprising was that they wanted to use it for Dubai Business Today which, “focuses on informing Japanese businessmen the various aspects of Dubai and the United Arab of Emirates in general.” The photo they asked about was this shot I took of the Las Vegas construction. Apparently, Dubai World is investing in the new MGM Mirage City Center project. I agreed to the request and asked for a credit on the photo, as well as a copy of the magazine, if possible. I didn’t expect to hear another word.

Lo and behold, yesterday in my mail was a large envelope from Japan, via airmail from Hong Kong. Inside was a copy of the October issue of Dubai Business Today, entirely in Japanese. And sure enough, in the middle of the magazine, as part of an inset article was my photo and name. It’s too bad that the caption and credit take up a lot of space at the bottom of the photo, but it’s still pretty cool (click the thumbnail at right for a larger view of the article). Does anyone read Japanese and want to tell me what it all says? So far, I’ve figured out the parts that are “MGM”.

I guess now I can officially call myself an “Internationally Published Photographer” or something. What a strange small world where I can visit Vegas for the first time… post a photo on the internet… and 6 months later it’s stumbled-upon and then published in a Japanese magazine about Dubai.

3 Years of Flickr and 1000 Photos

Sunset in Jordan, first photo posted to Flickr Somewhere in the midst of uploading bunches of photos from my New York trip, I surpassed 1000 uploaded photos on Flickr. This really isn’t a lot considering I’ve got tens of thousands more that I’ve taken, and many Flickr accounts have a few thousand photos here and there. From the start, I decided to be a little more selective with what I shared (everything is public by default, afterall), and see what else was out there. Just over 1000 photos now, 3 years later, equates to about 1 photo every day. They came in fits and starts, but if I can keep that up for another 3 or 10 years, I’ll be happy.

When I first started using Flickr in 2004, I was immediately hooked by many aspects of the site, but by far the most exciting for me wasn’t their fancy Flash (remember it used to be Flash back then?) Organizer, it was the idea of “community involvement by default” (public photos). This seemed scary at first (not to mention different from most other photo sharing sites at the time), but was completely engaging and kept me coming back. People were commenting, adding favorites, inviting to groups and generally connecting over each other’s photos. I immediately wanted to come back and post more to see what else I might discover.

And now for a little more trivia…